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History of Jerusalem and How to solve Palestine problem
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1) Vedic Sastra has answer for Palestinian, Israel problem. 
2) Biblical times: History of Jerusalem (Palestine). 
3) Changes in Israeli-Palestinian area map. 
 
 
1) Vedic Sastra has answer for Palestinian, Israel problem.
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1) Do you know what really happened from "Prophet Abraham (Prophet Ibraheem) time" to 1250BC in Israel and Palestinians places?  

2) Do you know why Jews faces and Palestinians Muslims faces looks similar and different from rest of the world? (Forget about skin color, hair color and eye color) 

3) Palestinians Muslims faces looks different from Muslims faces of other places but faces and skull shape similar to Jews faces.. Do you know why? Soon you will know. 
 
4) There is solution exist in "Vedic Sastra" for "Palestinians Muslims and Jews problem". Soon I let you know, first read below history information you will know who is wrong in Muslims and Jews problem. 

5) Problem between Israel and Palestinians Muslims is not major problem it is all about illegal weapon trade. If this problem doesnít exist how Middle East countries Govt. and Terrorist people buy illegal weapons from illegal market? Illegal market organizations are prolonging this problem for their income. Without country Govt permission Illegal weapon donít come from Manufactured country border. As you know rich countries making weapons, they are getting huge amount of money from Middle East countries Govt. and Terrorist people that is the reason world wide people are calling rich countries. Middle East countries Govt getting money (income) from oil fields but paying that money back rich countries by buying illegal weapons, So who are getting fool? Donít you think Muslims? 

                   One country trading illegal weapons, What is that country? I will give you one clue, find out your self. There are many terrorist organizations exists in all over the world but only one terrorist organization not getting illegal weapons because that terrorist organization located in that country where that country is controlling illegal weapon sale. That is the reason that country's terrorist organization not getting illegal weapons but other terrorist organizations in other country getting illegal weapons. Guess it that country name? Note: I donít write without any evidence OK. 

 
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2) Biblical times: History of Jerusalem (Palestine). 
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Jew man and Palestinian Muslim man face

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Ancient times The land that now encompasses Israel and the Palestinian territories has been conquered and re-conquered throughout history. 

Details of the ancient Israelite states are sketchy, derived for the most part from the first books of the Bible and classical history. Some of the key events include: 

Note: Eastern world people don't know what is Jews.. Jews are people same as muslims 
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"Jews" are people whose religion is "Judaism". 
"Muslims" are people whose religion is "Islam".
Both religions have close relationship with "Prophet Abraham" also called "Prophet Ibraham"!
1250BC- 638AD 

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1250 BC: Israelites began to conquer and settle the land of Canaan on the eastern Mediterranean coast.  
961-922 BC: Reign of King Solomon and construction of the Temple in Jerusalem. Solomon's reign was followed by the division of the land into two kingdoms. 
586 BC: The southern kingdom, Judah, was conquered by the Babylonians, who drove its people, the Jews, into exile and destroyed Solomon's Temple. After 70 years the Jews began to return and Jerusalem and the temple were gradually rebuilt.  
Classical period   
333 BC: "Alexander the Great" conquest brought the area under Greek rule.  
165 BC: A revolt in Judea established the last independent Jewish state of ancient times.  
63 BC: The Jewish state, Judea, was incorporated into the Roman province of Palestine  
70 AD: A revolt against Roman rule was put down by the Emperor Titus and the Second Temple was destroyed. This marks the beginning of the Jewish Diaspora, or dispersion.  
118-138 AD: During the Roman Emperor Hadrian's rule, Jews were initially allowed to return to Jerusalem, but - after another Jewish revolt in 133 - the city was completely destroyed and its people banished and sold into slavery.  
638 AD: Conquest by Arab Muslims ended Byzantine rule (the successor to Roman rule in the East). The second caliph of Islam, Omar, built a mosque at the site of what is now the al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem in the early years of the 8th Century. Apart from the age of the Crusaders (1099-1187), the region remained under Muslim rule until the fall of the "Ottoman Empire" in the 20th Century.
1897  First Zionist Congress 

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The "First Zionist Congress" met in Basle, Switzerland, to discuss the ideas set out in Theodor Herzl's 1896 book Der Judenstaat ("The Jewish State"). Herzl, a Jewish journalist and writer living in Vienna, wanted Jews to have their own state - primarily as a response to European anti-Semitism. 

The Congress issued the Basle Programme to establish a "home for the Jewish people in Palestine secured by public law" and set up the World Zionist Organisation to work for that end. 

A few Zionist immigrants had already started arriving in the area before 1897. By 1903 there were some 25,000 of them, mostly from Eastern Europe. They lived alongside about half a million Arab residents in what was then part of the Turkish Ottoman Empire. A second wave of about 40,000 immigrants arrived in the region between 1904 and 1914. 

1917  "Shifting sands" 

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At the time of World War I the area was ruled by the Turkish Ottoman empire. Turkish control ended when Arab forces backed by Britain drove out the Ottomans. 

Britain occupied the region at the end of the war in 1918 and was assigned as the mandatory power by the "League of Nations" on 25 April 1920. 

During this period of change, three key pledges were made. 

In 1916 the British Commissioner in Egypt, Sir Henry McMahon, had promised the Arab leadership post-war independence for former Ottoman Arab provinces. 

However, at the same time, the secret Sykes-Picot Agreement between war victors, Britain and France, divided the region under their joint control. 

Then in 1917, the British Foreign Minister Arthur Balfour committed Britain to work towards "the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people", in a letter to leading Zionist Lord Rothschild. It became known as the Balfour Declaration. 

1929-36 Arab discontent 

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The Zionist project of the 1920s and 1930s saw hundreds of thousands of Jews emigrating to British Mandate Palestine, provoking unrest in the Arab community. 

In 1922, a British census showed the Jewish population had risen to about 11% of Palestine's 750,000 inhabitants. More than 300,000 immigrants arrived in the next 15 years. 

Zionist-Arab antagonism boiled over into violent clashes in August 1929 when 133 Jews were killed by Palestinians and 110 Palestinians died at the hands of the British police. 

Arab discontent again exploded into widespread civil disobedience during a general strike in 1936. By this time, the militant Zionist group Irgun Zvai Leumi was orchestrating attacks on Palestinian and British targets with the aim of "liberating" Palestine and Transjordan (modern-day Jordan) by force. 

In July 1937, Britain, in a Royal Commission headed by former Secretary of State for India, Lord Peel, recommended partitioning the land into a Jewish state (about a third of British Mandate Palestine, including Galilee and the coastal plain) and an Arab one. 

Palestinian and Arab representatives rejected this and demanded an end to immigration and the safeguarding of a single unified state with protection of minority rights. Violent opposition continued until 1938 when it was crushed with reinforcements from the UK. 

1947 UN partition of Palestine 

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Britain, which had ruled Palestine since 1920, handed over responsibility for solving the Zionist-Arab problem to the UN in 1947. 

The territory was plagued with chronic unrest pitting native Arabs against Jewish immigrants (who now made up about a third the population, owning about 6% of the land). The situation had become more critical with the displacement of hundreds of thousands of Jews fleeing the Nazi persecution in Europe. Some six million Jews were killed in the Holocaust during World War II. 

The UN set up a special committee which recommended splitting the territory into separate Jewish and Palestinian states. Palestinian representatives, known as the Arab Higher Committee, rejected the proposal; their counterparts in the Jewish Agency accepted it. 

The partition plan gave 56.47% of Palestine to the Jewish state and 43.53% to the Arab state, with an international enclave around Jerusalem. On 29 November 1947, 33 countries of the UN General Assembly voted for partition, 13 voted against and 10 abstained. The plan, which was rejected by the Palestinians, was never implemented. 

Britain announced its intention to terminate its Palestine mandate on 15 May 1948 but hostilities broke out before the date arrived. 

The death of British soldiers in the conflict made the continuing presence in Palestine deeply unpopular in Britain. In addition, the British resented American pressure to allow in more Jewish refugees - a sign of growing US suport for Zionism. 

Both Arab and Jewish sides prepared for the coming confrontation by mobilising forces. The first "clearing" operations were conducted against Palestinian villages by Jewish forces in December. 

1948 Establishment of Israel 

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The State of Israel, the first Jewish state for nearly 2,000 years, was proclaimed at 1600 on 14 May 1948 in Tel Aviv. The declaration came into effect the following day as the last British troops withdrew. Palestinians remember 15 May as "al-Nakba", or the Catastrophe. 

The year had begun with Jewish and Arab armies each staging attacks on territory held by the other side. Jewish forces, backed by the Irgun and Lehi militant groups made more progress, seizing areas alloted to the Jewish state but also conquering substantial territories allocated for the Palestinian one. 

Irgun and Lehi massacred scores of inhabitants of the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on 9 April. Word of the massacre spread terror among Palestinians and hundreds of thousands fled to Lebanon, Egypt and the area now known as the West Bank. 

The Jewish armies were victorious in the Negev, Galilee, West Jerusalem and much of the coastal plain. 

The day after the state of Israel was declared five Arab armies from Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Iraq immediately invaded Israel but were repulsed, and the Israeli army crushed pockets of resistance. Armistices established Israel's borders on the frontier of most of the earlier British Mandate Palestine. 

Egypt kept the Gaza Strip while Jordan annexed the area around East Jerusalem and the land now known as the West Bank. These territories made up about 25% of the total area of British Mandate Palestine. 

1964 Formation of the PLO 

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Since 1948 there had been fierce competition between neighbouring states to lead an Arab response to the creation of Israel. That left the Palestinians as passive onlookers. 

In January 1964, Arab governments - wanting to create a Palestinian organisation that would remain essentially under their control - voted to create a body called the "Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO)". 

But the Palestinians wanted a genuinely independent body, and that was the goal of Yasser Arafat who took over the chairmanship of the PLO in 1969. His Fatah organisation (founded in secret five years earlier) was gaining notoriety with its armed operations against Israel. 

"Fatah fighters" inflicted heavy casualties on Israeli troops at Karameh in Jordan in 1968. 

1967  The 1967 War 

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Mounting tensions between Israel and its Arab neighbours culminated in six days of hostilities starting on 5 June 1967 and ending on 11 June - six days which changed the face of the Middle East conflict. 

Israel seized Gaza and the Sinai from Egypt in the south and the Golan Heights from Syria in the north. It also pushed Jordanian forces out of the West Bank and East Jerusalem. 

Egypt's powerful air force was put out of action on the first day of fighting when Israeli jets bombed it on the ground in a pre-emptive strike. 

The territorial gains doubled the area of land controlled by Israel. The victory heralded a new age of confidence and optimism for Israel and its supporters. 

The UN issued Security Council Resolution 242, stressing "the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by war" and calling for "withdrawal of Israeli armed forces from territories occupied in the recent conflict". 

According ot the UN, the conflict displaced another 500,000 Palestinians who fled to Egypt, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan.

1973  The 1973 "Yom Kippur war" 

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Unable to regain the territory they had lost in 1967 by diplomatic means, Egypt and Syria launched major offensives against Israel on the Jewish festival of the Day of Atonement or Yom Kippur. The clashes are also known as the Ramadan war. 

Initially, Egypt and Syria made advances in Sinai and the Golan Heights. These were reversed after three weeks of fighting. Israel eventually made gains beyond the 1967 ceasefire lines. 

Israeli forces pushed on into Syria beyond the Golan Heights, though they later gave up some of these gains. In Egypt, Israeli forces regained territory and advanced to the western side of the Suez Canal. 

The United States, the Soviet Union and the United Nations all made diplomatic interventions to bring about ceasefire agreements between the combatants. 

Egypt and Syria jointly lost an estimated 8,500 soldiers in the fighting, while Israel lost about 6,000. 

The war left Israel more dependent on the US for military, diplomatic and economic support. Soon after the war, Saudi Arabia led a petroleum embargo against states that supported Israel. The embargo, which caused a steep rises in petrol prices and fuel shortages across the world, lasted until March 1974. In October 1973 the UN Security Council passed resolution 338 which called for the combatants "to cease all firing and terminate all military activity immediately... [and start] negotiations between the parties concerned under appropriate auspices aimed at establishing a just and durable peace in the Middle East". 

1974  Arafat's first UN appearance 

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In the 1970s, under "Yasser Arafat's" leadership, PLO factions and other militant Palestinian groups such as Abu Nidal launched a series of attacks on Israeli and other targets. 

One such attack took place at the Munich Olympics in 1972 in which 11 Israeli athletes were killed. 

But while the PLO pursued the armed struggle to "liberate all of Palestine", in 1974, Arafat made a dramatic first appearance at the United Nations mooting a peaceful solution. 

He condemned the Zionist project, but concluded: "Today I have come bearing an olive branch and a freedom fighter's gun. Do not let the olive branch fall from my hand." 

The speech was a watershed in the Palestinians' search for international recognition of their cause. 

A year later, a US State Department official, Harold Saunders, acknowledged for the first time that "the legitimate interests of the Palestinian Arabs must be taken into account in the negotiating of an Arab-Israeli peace". 

1977   Israel's resurgent right wing 

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Hardline Irgun and Lehi groups may have been instrumental in the creation of Israel in 1948, but their heirs in the Herut (later Likud) party failed to win an Israeli election until 1977. 

Until this time Israeli politics had been dominated by the left-wing Labour Party. Likud ideology focused on extending Israeli sovereignty in the whole of the earlier Britsh Mandate Palestine, as well as claiming Jordanian territory as part of the "Greater Israel of Biblical times". 

The new government, led by former Irgun leader Menachem Begin, intensified Israeli settlement activity in the West Bank and Gaza with a view to creating "facts on the ground" to prevent any future territorial compromise over the areas captured in 1967. 

Agriculture minister Ariel Sharon spearheaded this movement as chairman of the ministerial committee for settlements until 1981. 

1979  Israel and Egypt make peace 

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Egyptian President Anwar Sadat stunned the world by flying to the Jewish state and making a speech to the Israeli parliament in Jerusalem on 19 November 1977. 

Sadat became the first Arab leader to recognise Israel, only four years after launching the October 1973 war (known as the Yom Kippur war in Israel). The war was indecisive after Egypt and Syria had attacked Israeli forces occupying Sinai and the Golan Heights. It ended with the issuing of UN Resolution 338 calling for "a just and durable peace in the Middle East". 

Egypt and Israel signed the Camp David accords in September 1978 outlining "the framework for peace in the Middle East" which included limited autonomy for Palestinians. A bilateral Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty was signed by Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin six months later in March 1979. 

The Sinai Peninsula, which Israel had seized in the 1967 war, was returned to Egypt. 

Arab states boycotted Egypt for breaking ranks and negotiating a separate treaty with Israel. 

Sadat was assassinated in 1981 by Islamist elements in the Egyptian army, who opposed peace with Israel, during national celebrations to mark the anniversary of the October war. 

1982   Israel invades Lebanon 

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The Israeli army launched a massive military incursion into Lebanon in the summer of 1982. Operation "Peace for Galilee" was intended to wipe out Palestinian guerrilla bases near Israel's northern border, although Defence Minister Ariel Sharon pushed all the way to Beirut and expelled the PLO from the country. 

The invasion began on 6 June, less than two months after the last Israeli troops and civilians were pulled out of Sinai under the 1979 treaty with Egypt. The action was triggered by the attempt on the life of Israeli ambassador to London Shlomo Argov by the dissident Palestinian group Abu Nidal. 

Israeli troops reached Beirut in August. A ceasefire agreement allowed the departure of PLO fighters from Lebanon, leaving Palestinian refugee camps defenceless. 

As Israeli forces gathered around Beirut on 14 September, Bashir Gemayel, leader of the Christian Phalange militia, was killed by a bomb at his HQ in the capital. The following day, the Israeli army occupied West Beirut. 

From 16 to 18 September, the Phalangists - who were allied to Israel - killed hundreds of Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps as they were encircled by Israeli troops in one of the worst atrocities of nearly a century of conflict in the Middle East. Mr Sharon resigned from his post as defence minister after a 1983 Israeli inquiry concluded that he had failed to act to prevent the massacre. 

1987  Palestinian intifada 

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A mass uprising - or intifada - against the Israeli occupation began in Gaza and quickly spread to the West Bank. 

Protest took the form of civil disobedience, general strikes, boycotts on Israeli products, graffiti, and barricades, but it was the stone-throwing demonstrations against the heavily-armed occupation troops that captured international attention. 

The Israeli Defence Forces responded and there was heavy loss of life among Palestinian civilians. More than 1,000 died in clashes which lasted until 1993.

1988  PLO opens door to peace 

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Despite its military might, Israel was unable to quell the intifada which started in 1987 and was backed by the entire Palestinian population living under Israeli occupation. 

For the PLO - based in Tunis since its expulsion from Lebanon in 1982 - the uprising threatened the loss of its role as the main player in the Palestinian "revolution" as focus shifted to the occupied territories and away from the diaspora population. 

The Palestinian National Council (a government-in-exile) convened in Algeria in November 1988 and voted to accept a "two-state" solution based on the 1947 UN partition resolution (181), renounce terrorism and seek a negotiated settlement based on Resolution 242, which called for Israel to withdraw from territory captured in the 1967 war, and Resolution 338. 

The US began dialogue with the PLO. But Israel continued to view the PLO as a terrorist organisation with which it would not negotiate. Instead, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir proposed elections in the occupied territories before negotiations on a self-rule agreement. 

1991 Madrid Summit 

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The 1991 Gulf War was a disaster for the PLO and its leader Yasser Arafat whose support for Iraq alienated his wealthy supporters in the Gulf. 

With Kuwait liberated from Iraqi control, the US administration devoted itself to Middle East peacemaking - a prospect more appealing to the financially weakened and politically isolated Arafat than Israel's hard-line Likud prime minister Yitzhak Shamir. 

Numerous visits by the US Secretary of State James Baker prepared the ground for an international summit in Madrid. Syria agreed to attend, hoping to negotiate a return of the Golan Heights. Jordan also accepted the invitation. 

But Shamir refused to talk directly with PLO "terrorists", so a joint Jordanian-Palestinian delegation was formed with prominent Palestinian figures- who were not from the PLO - taking part. In the days before the summit, Washington withheld $10bn of loan guarantees from Israel in a rare moment of discord over the building of Jewish settlements in the occupied territories. 

A worldwide audience watched the historic summit begin on 30 October. The old enemies were each given 45 minutes to set out their positions. The Palestinians spoke of a shared future of hope with Israel, Shamir justified the existence of the Jewish state, while Syrian Foreign Minister Farouq al-Shara dwelled on Mr Shamir's "terrorist" past. 

After the summit the US set up separate bilateral meetings in Washington between Israel and Syria, and with the Jordanian-Palestinian delegations. 

1993  The Oslo Peace Process 

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The election of the left-wing Labour government in June 1992, led by Yitzhak Rabin, triggered a period of frenetic Israeli-Arab peacemaking in the mid-1990s. 

The government - including the "iron-fisted" Rabin and doves Shimon Peres and Yossi Beilin - was uniquely placed to talk seriously about peace with the Palestinians. The PLO, meanwhile, wanted to make peace talks work because of the weakness of its position due to the Gulf War. 

Israel immediately lifted a ban on PLO participants in the stalemated bilateral meetings in Washington. More significantly Foreign Minister Peres and his deputy Beilin explored the possibility of activating a secret forum for talks facilitated by Norway. 

With the Washington bilateral talks going nowhere, the secret "Oslo track" - opened on 20 January 1993 in the Norwegian town of Sarpsborg - made unprecedented progress. The Palestinians consented to recognise Israel in return for the beginning of phased dismantling of Israel's occupation. 

Negotiations culminated in the Declaration of Principles, signed on the White House lawn and sealed with a historic first handshake between Rabin and Yasser Arafat watched by 400 million people around the world. 

1994  Birth of the Palestinian Authority 

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On 4 May 1994 Israel and the Palestinian Liberation Organisation reached an agreement in Cairo on the initial implementation of the 1993 Declaration of Principles. This document specified Israel's military withdrawal from most of the Gaza Strip, excluding Jewish settlements and land around them, and from the Palestinian town of Jericho in the West Bank. Negotiations were difficult and were almost derailed on 25 February when a Jewish settler in the West Bank town of Hebron fired on praying Muslims, killing 29 people. 

The agreement itself contained potential pitfalls. It envisaged further withdrawals during a five-year interim period during which solutions to the really difficult issues were to be negotiated - issues such as the establishment of a Palestinian state, the status of Jerusalem, Jewish settlements in the Occupied Territories and the fate of more than 3.5 million Palestinian refugees from the 1948 and 1967 upheavals. 

Many critics of the peace process were silenced on 1 July as jubilant crowds lined the streets of Gaza to cheer Yasser Arafat on his triumphal return to Palestinian territory. The returning Palestinian Liberation Army deployed in areas vacated by Israeli troops and Arafat became head of the new Palestinian National Authority (PA) in the autonomous areas. He was elected president of the Authority in January 1996. 

1995   Oslo II and the assassination of Rabin 

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The first year of Palestinian self-rule in Gaza and Jericho was dogged by difficulties. Bomb attacks by Palestinian militants killed dozens of Israelis, while Israel blockaded the autonomous areas and assassinated militants. Settlement activity continued. The Palestinian Authority quelled unrest by mass detentions. Opposition to the peace process grew among right-wingers and religious nationalists in Israel. 

Against this background, peace talks were laborious and fell behind schedule. But on 24 September the so-called Oslo II agreement was signed in Taba in Egypt, and countersigned four days later in Washington. 

The agreement divided the West Bank into three zones: 
 
Zone A comprised 7% of the territory (the main Palestinian towns excluding Hebron and East Jerusalem) going to full Palestinian control; 
Zone B comprised 21% of the territory under joint Israeli-Palestinian control; 
Zone C stayed in Israeli hands. Israel was also to release Palestinian prisoners. Further handovers followed. 
Oslo II was greeted with little enthusiasm by Palestinians, while Israel's religious right was furious at the "surrender of Jewish land". Amid an incitement campaign against Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, a Jewish religious extremist assassinated him on 4 November, sending shock waves around the world. The dovish Shimon Peres, architect of the faltering peace process, became prime minister. 

1996-99  Deadlock 

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Conflict returned early in 1996 with a series of devastating suicide bombings in Israel carried out by the Islamic militant group Hamas, and a bloody three-week bombardment of Lebanon by Israel. 

Peres narrowly lost elections on 29 May to the right-wing Binyamin "Bibi" Netanyahu, who campaigned against the Oslo peace deals under the motto "Peace with Security". 

Netanyahu soon enflamed Arab opinion by lifting a freeze on building new settlements in the occupied territories and provoking fears about undermining Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem by opening an archaeological tunnel under the compound of al-Aqsa mosque - one of Islam's holiest sites. 

Despite his antagonism towards the existing peace process, Netanyahu, under increasing US pressure, handed over 80% of Hebron in January 1997 and signed the Wye River Memorandum on 23 October 1998 outlining further withdrawals from the West Bank. 

But his right-wing coalition collapsed in January 1999 in disarray over the implementation of the Wye deal. He lost elections on 18 May to Labour's Ehud Barak who pledged to "end the 100-year conflict" between Israel and the Arabs within one year. 

The five-year interim period defined by Oslo for a final resolution passed on 4 May 1999, but Yasser Arafat was persuaded to defer unilateral declaration of Palestinian statehood to give a chance for negotiations with the new administration. 

2000  Second intifada 

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Initial optimism about the peacemaking prospects of a government led by Ehud Barak proved unfounded. A new Wye River accord was signed in September 1999 but further withdrawals from occupied land were hindered by disagreements and final status talks (on Jerusalem, refugees, settlements and borders) got nowhere. Frustration was building in the Palestinian population who had little to show for five years of the peace process. 

Barak concentrated on peace with Syria - also unsuccessfully. But he did succeed in fulfilling a campaign pledge to end Israel's 21-year entanglement in Lebanon. 

After the withdrawal from Lebanon in May 2000, attention turned back to Yasser Arafat, who was under pressure from Barak and US President Bill Clinton to abandon gradual negotiations and launch an all-out push for a final settlement at the presidential retreat at Camp David. Two weeks of talks failed to come up with acceptable solutions to the status of Jerusalem and the right of return of Palestinian refugees. 

In the uncertainty of the ensuing impasse, Ariel Sharon, the veteran right-winger who succeeded Binyamin Netanyahu as Likud leader, toured the al-Aqsa/Temple Mount complex in Jerusalem on 28 September. Sharon's critics saw it as a highly provocative move. Palestinian demonstrations followed, quickly developing into what became known as the al-Aqsa intifada, or uprising. 

2001  Sharon returns 

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By the end of 2000 Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak found himself presiding over an increasingly bitter and bloody cycle of violence as the intifada raged against Israel's occupation in the West Bank and Gaza. 

With his coalition collapsing around him, Barak resigned as prime minister on 10 December to "seek a new mandate" to deal with the crisis. However in elections on 6 Febuary, Ariel Sharon was swept to power by an Israeli electorate that had overwhelmingly turned its back on the land-for-peace formulas of the 1990s and now favoured a tougher approach to Israel's "Palestinian problem". 

The death toll soared as Sharon intensified existing policies such as assassinating Palestinian militants, air strikes and incursions into Palestinian self-rule areas. Palestinian militants, meanwhile, stepped up suicide bomb attacks in Israeli cities. 

The US spearheaded international efforts to calm the violence. Envoy George Mitchell led an inquiry into the uprising, while CIA director George Tenet negotiated a ceasefire - but neither initiative broke the cycle of bloodshed.

2002-03  West Bank re-occupied 

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After waves of suicide attacks early in the year, Israel re-occupied almost all of the West Bank in March, and again in June. For most of 2002, Palestinian cities were regularly raided, remained cut off from each other, surrounded and under curfew for long periods of time. 

In April, Israeli forces entered and captured the refugee camp in northern West Bank city of Jenin. The Palestinians claimed massacre. The Israeli army, which took heavy casualties, said it met heavy organised resistance, and insisted that 52 Palestinians were killed. 

A UN report criticised both sides for "violence that placed civilians in harm's way", and concluded that there was no massacre of civilians. A report by the human rights group Amnesty International concluded however that that the Israeli army had committed war crimes during its incursions into the West Bank towns of Jenin and Nablus. 

In May, a five-week standoff at Bethlehem's Church of the Nativity ended when 13 Palestinian militants were sent into exile. A large group of Palestinians had taken refuge in the church when Israeli troops moved into the town. 

Israeli officials said the operations in the West Bank and Gaza throughout 2002 were aimed at destroying the Palestinian terrorist infrastructure. Through the year, suicide attacks continued, though at a reduced rate. 

For the second year running the peace process was in deep freeze. The Quartet, the United States, Russia, the United Nations and the European Union tried to revive it with the "roadmap" for Middle East settlement. The publication of the document was delayed by wrangling over its contents in 2002. Diplomatic initiatives were put on hold until after the US-led war in Iraq in April 2003 when the roadmap was published. 

In June, President George Bush made a long-anticipated statement on the Middle East. He called for Palestinians to replace their leader with one not "compromised by terror".

 
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3) Changes in Israeli-Palestinian area map
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Introduction 

At the heart of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a dispute over land and borders. The geography of the conflict revolves around the three territorial units of Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, defined by armistice lines drawn after a war in the region in 1948. Since then, military action, settlement and population growth have also shaped the situation on the ground. 

BBC News Online explores the conflict by comparing maps of the region over time

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British control: Sykes-Picot 

The "Sykes-Picot agreement" was a secret understanding concluded in 1916 between Great Britain and France, with the assent of Russia, for the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire. The agreement was not implemented, but it established the principles for the division a few years later of the Turkish-held region into the French and British-administered areas of Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Palestine.
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British control: Mandate Palestine 

Palestine - comprising what are now Israel, the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Jordan - was among several former Ottoman Arab territories placed under the administration of Great Britain by the League of Nations. The mandate lasted from 1920 to 1948. In 1923 Britain granted limited autonomy to Transjordan, now known as Jordan. 
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Israel founded: UN partition plan 

The United Nations General Assembly decided in 1947 on the partition of Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, with Jerusalem to be an international city. The plan, which was rejected by the native Arabs, was never implemented.
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Israel founded: Armistice 

War broke out in 1948 when Britain withdrew, the Jews declared the state of Israel and troops from neighbouring Arab nations moved in. After eight months of fighting an armistice line was agreed, establishing the West Bank and Gaza Strip as distinct geographical units.  
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Six-Day War: Before the war 

From 1948 to 1967, the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, was ruled by Jordan. During this period, the Gaza Strip was under Egyptian military administration. Israeli troops captured Egypt's Sinai peninsula during the 1956 British, French and Israeli military campaign in response to the nationalisation of the "Suez Canal". The Israelis subsequently withdrew and were replaced with a UN force. In 1967, Egypt ordered the UN troops out and blocked Israeli shipping routes - adding to already high levels of tension between Israel and its neighbours.
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Six-Day War: After the war 

In a pre-emptive attack on Egypt that drew Syria and Jordan into a regional war in 1967, Israel made massive territorial gains capturing the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Golan Heights and the Sinai Peninsula up to the Suez Canal. The principle of land-for-peace that has formed the basis of Arab-Israeli negotiations is based on Israel giving up land won in the 1967 war in return for peace deals recognising Israeli borders and its right to security. The Sinai Peninsula was returned to Egypt as part of the 1979 peace deal with Israel.
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Jerusalem: Before 1967 

The armistice line drawn at the end of the 1948 war divided Jerusalem into two. Between 1949 and 1967, Israel controlled the western part of Jerusalem, while Jordan took the eastern part, including the old walled city containing important Jewish, Muslim and Christian religious sites.
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Jerusalem: After 1967 

Israel captured the whole of Jerusalem in 1967 and extended the city's municipal boundaries, putting both East and West Jerusalem under its sovereignty and civil law. In 1980 Israel passed a law making its annexation of East Jerusalem explicit. The city's status remains disputed, with Israel's occupation of East Jerusalem considered illegal under international law. Israel is determined that Jerusalem be its undivided capital, while Palestinians are seeking to establish their capital in East Jerusalem. 
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West Bank: Palestinian-controlled areas 

Since the 1993 Declaration of Principles resulting from the Oslo peace process, there have been several handovers of land to differing degrees of Palestinian control. Currently 59% of the West Bank is officially under Israeli civil and security control. Another 23% of it is under Palestinian civil control, but Israeli security control. The remainder of the territory is governed by the Palestinian National Authority - although such areas have been subject to Israeli incursions during the recent intifada.
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West Bank: Population centres 

The areas of Palestinian Authority control are mainly located in Palestinian urban areas Ė the population centres where much of the fast-growing population lives. These take up about 8.5% of the West Bank. About 2.3 million Palestinians live in the West Bank, together with about 400,000 Israeli settlers - including those who live in East Jerusalem. About 6.7 million people live in Israel, of whom about 1.3 million are Israeli Arabs.
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West Bank: Israeli settlements 

Since 1967, Israel has pursued a policy of building settlements on the West Bank. These cover about 2% of the area of the West Bank and are linked by Israeli-controlled roads. There are also large tracts of Israeli-controlled land designated as military areas or nature reserves.
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West Bank: Israeli settlements

Since 1967, Israel has pursued a policy of building settlements on the West Bank. These cover about 2% of the area of the West Bank and are linked by Israeli-controlled roads. There are also large tracts of Israeli-controlled land designated as military areas or nature reserves 
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West Bank: Israeli checkpoints 

Military checkpoints on West Bank roads allow Israel to monitor and control travel in much of the West Bank. During the recent Palestinian intifada, Israeli troops have also encircled and staged incursions into population centres and severely restricted the movement of Palestinian civilians. In 2002, Israel began building a security barrier near the north-western edge of the West Bank.
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Gaza Strip: Population 

Gaza, one of the most densely populated tracts of land in the world, is home to about 1.3m Palestinians, about 33% of whom live in United Nations-funded refugee camps. Gaza is also home to about 8,000 Jewish settlers.
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Gaza Strip: Settlements and security 

Israeli settlement areas cover about 15% of the Gaza Strip. Israel controls all external borders and crossing points and some roads in Gaza. 
 
 
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4) Vedic Sastra has answer for Palestinian, Israel problem.
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1) Do you know what really happened from Prophet Abraham (Prophet Ibraheem) time to 1250BC in Israel and Palestinians places?  

2) Do you know why Jews faces and Palestinians Muslims faces looks similar and different from rest of the world? (Forget about skin color, hair color and eye color) 

3) Palestinians Muslims faces looks different from Muslims faces of other places but faces and skull shape similar to Jews faces.. Do you know why? Soon you will know. 

4) There is solution exist in "Vedic Sastra" for Palestinians Muslims and Jews problem. "Bible", "Koran", Jewish holy books says World Ends and then "Judgement days" starts. After Judgement days ends what is going to happen? These things not written in Bible, Koran and Jewish holy books but something written in Hindu holy book Vedic Sastra. Vedic Sastra says After End Of World (I mean after end of "Kali Yuga") Judgement days starts, after Judgement days world restart again. The New World also called Satya Yuga. So in last World Jews used to stay in "Jerusalem (Israel)" but After last Judgement Days God removed all religions. As you know what is the point keeping religions after Judgement Days. Even Muslims know Isa (Jesus Second Come) removes all religions in Judgement days. So what you think Palestine Muslims were Jews in Last world. I mean to say Jews and Palestine Muslims are belongs to same Blood, that is the reason Jews faces and Palestine Muslims faces almost same compared to other faces in the world. When Jews and Palestine Muslims know that both are belongs to same blood than do they still fight each other?   

5) Problem between Israel and Palestinians Muslims is not major problem it is all about illegal weapon trade. If this problem doesnít exist how Middle East countries Govt. and Terrorist people buy illegal weapons from illegal market? Illegal market organizations are prolonging this problem for their income. Without country Govt permission Illegal weapon donít come from Manufactured country border. As you know rich countries making weapons, they are getting huge amount of money from Middle East countries Govt. and Terrorist people that is the reason world wide people are calling rich countries. Middle East countries Govt getting money (income) from oil fields but paying that money back rich countries by buying illegal weapons, So who are getting fool? Donít you think Muslims? 

One country trading illegal weapons, What is that country? I will give you one clue, find out your self. There are many terrorist organizations exists in all over the world but only one terrorist organization not getting illegal weapons because that terrorist organization located in that country where that country is controlling illegal weapon sale. That is the reason that country's terrorist organization not getting illegal weapons but other terrorist organizations in other country getting illegal weapons. Guess it that country name? Note: I donít write without any evidence OK. 

6) Muslims believe four Holy book, those Holy book are "Koran", "Engile", "Thorath" and "Zaboor". What Muslims following now is "Koran". Holy book "Engile" is nothing but Bible, "Thorath" is nothing but Jews Holy book. But non of Muslims know what is "Zaboor" holy book, where this book exist? and How many pages this book contains? The question is Does "Zaboor" has answer for Palestinians Muslims and Jews problem? If any one donít find answer for question in one holy book then they try to look answer for your question in other holy book.
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